How to Use a Drone License for Good (or Evil)

Getting a drone license is an important responsibility that should not be taken too lightly.

It is relatively easy to get a drone pilot’s license, and a convenient way to fly an aircraft without actually having to risk getting inside of it. In the US, you must be at least 16 years old and have a valid government issued picture ID. Pay $150 to make an appointment at an FAA approved testing center, and then study and pass the test. Then all you have to do is pass a TSA background check.

You can print out the drone pilot certification until it arrives in the mail. Also it is necessary to purchase and register a drone. After that you are cool to fly the drone under most circumstances. Now is the time to decide how you plan to use your new drone and license to fly a drone.

10 Ways to Use a Drone for Good

Search and Rescue Missions – When people are lost in the wilderness drones are capable of conducting flights in out of the way regions. And they cost less than rescue planes.

Delivering Food and Other Goods – When a high tech drone delivers the restaurant meal you could have gotten off the couch and picked up with a small amount of effort, you never have to tip.

Inspecting Tall Objects/Buildings – Drones have applications in telecommunications, aviation and construction. They can be used to easily inspect cell phone towers, jumbo jets and skyscrapers.

Collecting Scientific Data – There have been studies in which scientists used drones to collect information on disease patterns, or explore dangerous areas such as active volcanos.

Aerial Photography – The art of aerial photography has reached new bounds. Right now the art is relatively young, so it’s mostly just a lot of pictures of fields and country roads.

Agriculture – Drones are a less costly means of inspecting crops as well as large tracts of land used for farmings. This enables farmers to use less pesticides and chemical fertilizers.

Helping After Natural Disasters – When there is a large scale natural disaster, such as a forest fire, hurricane, tornado or earthquake, drone cameras can be used to search the area for survivors.

Protecting Native Wildlife – At one point someone used drones to film all of those tigers in that illegal farm in southeast Asia. Although it was unclear if anyone ever actually saved the tigers.

Managing Traffic Safety – Aerial drones can monitor traffic conditions at a lesser price than that of a traffic helicopter, and of course the crew needed to man that helicopter.

Keeping the Wi-Fi on – Executives at Google and Facebook have both revealed plans to use drones to expand the range of Wi-fi signals, because they can go much higher than towers.

10 Ways to Use a Drone for Evil

Spying on People – It’s definitely not cool to use your new drone to spy on the girl/guy next door. They will probably notice the buzzing drone floating overhead like a giant mechanical wasp.

Dropping Explosives on People – The military uses drones to conduct air raids in the Middle East, and possibly elsewhere. There have been many reports of drone-induced PTSD in US veterans.

Strip Mining Prospector – Inspecting land for surveying purposes is one thing. But please don’t subject an area of land to open pit mining, as it destroys precious forests and wildlife habitats.

Killing Native Wildlife – There is nothing wrong with being a bunny hugger. They are soft and adorable. Rabbits have a hard lot in life and are basically hopping meat bags.

Delivering Evil Packages – If Amazon and the USPS are using drones to complete package deliveries, then it’s not that far a leap to drug traffickers, or maybe hardcore porn distributors.

Interferring with Air Traffic – Scientists at NASA are hard at work figuring out the best way to balance civilian drones with passing aircraft. Just please don’t aim your drone at police choppers.

Evil Drone Porn – I’m sure someone has already figured it out. By evil porn I mean explicit sex between two or more individuals in illegal or profane circumstances.

Being a Public Nuisance – The sound of a small aircraft whizzing by several time per day can be disconcerting to the surrounding population. Don’t add speakers turned up to full volume.

Spreading Poisonous Chemicals – There is no need to dust your crops with poisonous insecticides, fungicides or other chemicals when you have a drone to inspect for such issues.

Flying a Drone Without a License – If you are caught and charged with flying a drone without a license, you are subject to a fine from the FAA between $1,100 and $1.9 million.

 

Photograph by Gabriel Scanu

blackbettyblog

In addition to publishing a blog, Elizabeth de Moya aka Black Betty has contributed to DJ Mag, LA Weekly and Vice, Inc. Currently she is interested in search engine optimization and online marketing. She has a BA in Linguistics from Berkeley. Follow all of her social media profiles as soon as possible.

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